No. 93 October 2012 : Black & White : For Collectors of Fine Photography

Issue No. 93

  1. Robert Fitch: a Spirit of Resistance

    An ordained minister and pioneering photo- journalist, Fitch was on the front lines of the civil rights movement documenting the struggle for equal rights. He was also Dr. Martin Luther King’s personal photographer, and covered many other key leaders during this contentious era in American history.

  2. William Mortensen: a Re-Introduction

    Despite being vilified by the photographic establishment during his career, William Mortensen created a provocative and controversial body of work that was decades ahead of its time. He rejected the purist approach of the Group f.64 in favor of constructed imagery that explored some of the darker aspects of human nature.

  3. Interview: Martine Franck

    French documentary photography has an aesthetic all its own: incisive, ironic, slightly detached and suffused with unsentimental warmth. One of its most remarkable practi- tioners is Martine Franck, who has covered practically the entire spectrum of the human condition, with particular emphasis on the young, the old and the arts.

  4. Dennis Manarchy: Vanishing Cultures

    Although big themes are often best tackled with small cameras, Dennis Manarchy designed one of the world’s largest film cameras for his “Vanishing Cultures” series, which etches in silver-gelatin the faces of cultures and populations on the verge of disappearing. The scope and bravado of this work is life-affirming in the extreme.

  5. Profile: Jerry Takigawa

    Time, memory and mortality coalesce in Takigawa’s elegantly conceived imagery. His photographs of family are at once distanced and intimate, and resonate with a powerful surge of emotional universality.

  6. Profile: Art Wolfe

    One of the most accomplished and celebrat- ed nature photographers in the business recently took a fascinating studio detour to produce a startling body of work that cele- brates the human body in unexpected fashion.

  7. Profile: Nathan Troi Anderson

    Photographing in the twilight time between day and night, Anderson has created a unique set of images in which otherworldly landscapes manifest as the light fades and vision becomes problematic. The fascinating results raise intriguing questions about innocence and spirituality and how detached from those qualities we’ve become.


Bert Ihlenfeld
Ilya Genin
Lance Thorn
Jim McKinniss
Susan Mills
Kirk Allen