No. 62 October 2008 : B&W : For Collectors of Fine Photography

Issue No. 62

  1. Creative Journey

    For over 30 years, Sebastião Salgado has been a roving prophet with a camera. For our 12-page feature article, Dean Brierly picks 15 images from Salgado’s new book, Africa.

  2. The Negative

    Margaret Regan examines a portfolio recently issued by Tucson’s Etherton Gallery of images from John Loengard’s 1994 book classic, Celebrating the Negative.

  3. Herb Snitzer

    At 75, this New Yorker, now living in Florida, is still actively photographing. “For me, photography remains an ongoing thing, and I hope that 100 years from now my work won’t be forgotten and that people will still be looking to see what our culture was like. From an ego stand-point, that’s important.”

  4. Beth Moon

    Whether she’s recording the majestic baobab trees, capturing the strange balance between childhood innocence and the darker wisdom of nature, or constructing fanciful dreamscapes, she reveals a magical appreciation for the ways in which time, memory and nature define our place in the universe.

  5. Johan Hagemeyer

    A friend, confidante, and creative colleague of such notable con-temporaries as Edward Weston and Tina Modotti, his work is getting renewed attention.

  6. Jennifer Schlesinger

    She describes her moody, dreamlike Moon series as a “metaphorical interpretation” of pregnancy and the development of human life and its relations to the great time cycles of the natural world.

  7. Dean Brierly

    He is dedicated to darkroom printing, multiple negatives, duotone solarization, toning, and found objects. His imagery engages the element of chance, and his use of chemicals to achieve spontaneous fluidity is analogous to painting.

  8. Sam Baardman

    “The connection between art and activism is complex. As a land-scape photographer I hope that nature can be presented beautifully without being romanticized.”

  9. Benjamin Goss

    “At an early age I developed a distaste for urban sprawl. I’m sure that my subconscious response to that has contributed to what I perceive as the uneasy relationship most people have with their urban environment.”

  10. Wendy James

    “I like getting to the edge of what might feel a little uncomfortable. I consider myself as an optimistic person, but see somewhat darker moments as fertile ground for new growth and insight.”
  11. Eric Kellerman

    “The photographs in this series express my ongoing concern with chiaroscuro and the female body, with the light stripes suggesting anatomical continuities that don’t really exist.”

  12. Ian Wright

    “I was the first to photograph the Beatles, and 18 months later there were 150 photographers from the press waiting when they returned from America. I knew then that the exclusiveness had gone, and I never saw them again after that day.”