No. 38 August 2005 : B&W : For Collectors of Fine Photography

Issue No. 38

  1. Looking Glass

    Anonymous photography has become the latest trend in collecting. Gail Pine and Jackie Woods show images from their collection and tell what they have learned along the way.

  2. Beaumont Newhall

    One of the most influential photography historians—and one of the pioneers responsible for elevating photography to the level of fine art—he not only lectured and wrote books and articles, but also built his own legacy as a photographer. With cooperation of the Beaumont Newhall Estate, held by Scheinbaum & Russek Ltd. in Santa Fe, New Mexico, we are pleased to feature 10 pages on his finest work.

  3. Martin Elkort

    A member of the highly influential Photo League in 1950s New York, his delightful images of a hopeful and exuberant mid-century America embody his abiding belief in the inherent value of photography as both history and ar

  4. Joseph Szabo

    In a tribute to the American teen-ager of the 1970s and 1980s, he captured their world to an extent few others have done.

  5. Seema Weatherwax

    As this issue comes out, she celebrates her 100th birthday, look-ing back on a photographic career than began in the 1930s.

  6. William Davis

    When this Little Rock, Arkansas, commercial photographer retired in 1983, he hit his stride as a fine-art photographer.

  7. Sylvia de Swaan

    Looking to capture the shadows of her childhood memories, she returned to Eastern Europe with film and camera.

  8. Milan Hristev

    This native of Bulgaria travels the ancient world in search of motifs for his magical multi-exposure images.

  9. Aleksey Lapkovsky

    Originally from Moscow, now living in London, he uses large-format Polaroid P/N 55 to create multi-image portraits of musicians and athletes that are rich with allegorical themes.

  10. John Poteete

    A child of the Deep South—he still makes his home in Chattanooga, Tennessee—he walks the backroads of the milieu he loves, looking for scenes that portray a rapidly vanishing way of life.

  11. Dorothy Richardson

    Finding inspiration in the familiar and everyday, she uses her pinhole camera to capture images of the world around her that are filled with the aura of mystery.