No. 37 June 2005 : B&W : For Collectors of Fine Photography

Issue No. 37

  1. Regional Focus

    Heather Snider takes us on a 20-page tour of photography in South Africa—past and present.

  2. Dody Weston Thompson

    She enjoyed a unique position in American photography during the second half of the 20th century, having been apprentice to Edward Weston, assistant to Ansel Adams, and wife to Brett Weston. Her long career spans work as photographer, writer, historian, teacher, filmmaker and co-founder of Aperture magazine. We are pleased to feature some of her most important images.

  3. Curtis Knapp

    Twenty years ago, leaving a career as portrait photographer to New York City’s in-crowd, he moved to Japan, where he rose to the top of its competitive world of commercial photography. Now he has returned to the U.S. Preparing for a come-back, he is curious to find out if his minimalist style is still in vogue.

  4. Jason Weston

    Inspired to photograph by his great-uncle, Brett, he felt both advantaged and disadvantaged by the connection. After two decades, he is ready to show his work.

  5. Dominique Bollinger

    A Frenchman living in Italy, he scours its islands in search of motifs for his architectural studies.

  6. Joakim Eneroth

    Using a pinhole camera of his own design, this Swede focuses on his uniquely personal world.

  7. Glen Green

    Based in South Africa, he travels throughout the continent, capturing images that reflect a disappearing way of life.

  8. Morry Katz

    He concentrates on small portions of reality, allowing the viewers of his photographs to see only what he wants them to see.

  9. D. R. Martin

    More than three decades ago, as a young man, he wanted to walk in Cartier-Bresson’s footsteps, travel-ing the world—but he could only afford a trip to Europe (and shooting around his hometown of Duluth). He put the camera away and didn’t look at his work until now.

  10. Eriko Martinez

    Raised in Japan, now living in California, she remembers her child- hood in the homeland and its concept of Wabi Sabi—the beauty of imperfection. This concept guides her extreme flower closeups.

  11. Nancy Warner

    Returning to her roots in Nebraska, neglected homesteads, with their flaking wallpaper and rusting tools, remind her of a simpler time.