No. 36 April 2005 : B&W : For Collectors of Fine Photography

Issue No. 36

  1. Diane Arbus Revisited

    As the traveling retrospective arrives in New York, Susan Ehrens looks at the exhibition, which has dramatically expanded understanding of one of our most important 20th-century artists.

  2. Lou Stoumen

    He was a poet with a camera strapped around his neck, zooming in on glimpses of life that ranged from the whimsical to the poignant. Traveling the world, he captured Times Square in the late 1930s, shot World War Two as a combat photographer, filmed award-winning documentaries and published numerous books. A Barry Singer Gallery retrospective celebrates his accomplishments.

  3. Ken Merfeld

    As a Los Angeles-based commercial photographer with bigtime corporate clients, he rebels against today’s high-tec-driven world of photography by returning to old-world processes. His series of collodion portraits is a unique expression not only of a lost process but of his deep insight into the personalities of his subjects.

  4. David Spindler

    An accomplished musician (and darkroom printer with Frank, Winogrand and Weegee on his resume), he makes music with the camera.

  5. Bob Delevante

    Using his own children as models, he captures the uncomplicated joys and pleasures of childhood.

  6. Harry Hinkle

    Escaping from the hustle and bustle of modern life, he haunts dilapidated buildings looking for expressions of serenity.

  7. John Martinotti

    Growing up with reminders of the past, he trains his camera on objects that bring back memories of the “good old days.”

  8. Mark Simon

    Endlessly creative, he likes to shoot on overcast or rainy days or go out at night to experiment with long exposures.

  9. Ric Savid

    A Peace Corps volunteer in the Philippines in the mid-1970s, he became fascinated by its people and culture—a passion reflected in personal images that transcend the usual parameters of documentary photography.

  10. Blake Smith

    He is a minimalist. He likes to show just a few small elements from the natural world that suggest rather than describe the point of his photograph.

  11. Happy Walters

    A manager of athletes and rock groups by vocation, his avocation is photography, which enables him to explore his own feelings with greater depth and insight.