No. 34 December 2004 : B&W : For Collectors of Fine Photography

Issue No. 34

  1. Personal Tribute

    The recent passing of Henri Cartier-Bresson prompted Peter Fetterman, whose Santa Monica gallery is one of the leading promoters of the Frenchman’s work, to pen a personal tribute based on the memories of a visit with Bresson at his Paris home.

  2. Looking Glass

    Richard Pitnick talks to dealers Paul Hertzmann and Susan Herzig about their collection of works by Ten Photographers—students of Minor White at the California School of Fine Art.

  3. Sylvia Plachy

    Her new book, Self Portrait with Cows Going Home, reaffirms her stature as a gifted visual storyteller. From the book, we pick 14 images, the result of repeated visits to Eastern Europe (where she grew up during the Communist era), all brimming with the nostalgia of “going home.”

  4. Tomio Seike

    He has became a favorite of collectors thanks to his poetic images of Paris at night, lyrical water scenes from the English countryside, and sensual nudes.

  5. Carlos Gustavo

    He is a great talent on the verge of discovery, ready to reap his deserved due—he has toiled for years, giving his all to his art, living off occasional print sales and the warm hearts of a few good friends and admirers, all the while pursuing his dream. Dark and edgy, his work urges its viewers to share the deep convictions of its creator.

  6. S. Paul

    Called India’s Cartier-Bresson, with a career spanning half a century, he has earned a spot as one of his nation’s most accomplished documentary photographers.

  7. Benn Mitchell

    Selling his first photograph to LIFE when he was 16, his New York street scenes from the 1950s are all the rage for a new generation.

  8. Seamus Ryan

    Moving beyond standard floral photography, his intimate ”portraits” capture the hidden soul.

  9. Graham French

    Needing breaks from his hectic commercial schedule, he camps out in the wilderness, accompanied only by his camera.

  10. Matthew Altenbach

    One day, looking through his archive, he came across a group of photographs—including a self-portrait—he had taken two decades ago deep in the Florida back country. They jogged his memory in the same way looking at them today jogs ours.

  11. Jerzy Wiezerbicki

    His struggle is two-fold: to capture images of a vanishing world, and to fight the fact that documentary photography is still held in low esteem in his native Poland.

  12. Mark Arbeit

    Placing nude models in artist’s studios, he creates images that express an intriguing seamless blending of artistic and human forms.